Can you hear me now?


Telephone scams growing rapidly

By Holly Estepp - Vandalia Police Department - Crime Prevention Officer



Estepp

Estepp


File photo

Telephone scams have run rampant across the nation Have you ever received a call where the person ask, “Can you hear me now?” They want you to say, “Yes” so they have your voice on recording. The scammers will then sign you up for products you never agreed to get or pay for. When you try to dispute the chargers, the scammer will then play back the recording of you agreeing.

Another scam we have seen in Vandalia is the Microsoft scam. This scam uses scare tactics to trick you into paying for unnecessary technical support services that supposedly fixes your computer.

The scammers may call and say they are from Microsoft and even make the caller ID so that it displays a legitimate support phone number from Microsoft. They can then ask you to install applications that gives them remote access to your device. Using remote access, these experienced scammers can misrepresent normal system output as signs of problems.

Scammers can initiate contact by displaying fake error messages on websites you visit, displaying support numbers and enticing you to call. They can also put your browser on full screen and display pop-up messages that won’t go away, essentially locking your browser. These fake error messages aim to trick you into calling an indicated technical support hotline. Note that Microsoft error and warning messages never include phone numbers. If you are having issues with your computer or an error message pops up asking you to call Microsoft, take your computer to a local computer repair shop and have a professional look at your computer to fix the problem.

Have you ever received a call stating the police have a warrant for your arrest and you need to pay money to have the warrant taken away? Usually they want payment in gift cards. Two important clues to take away on this call. The police will most likely never call you unexpectedly to tell you have a warrant. Secondly, we will never accept payment for the warrant in form of gift cards.

Remember, scammers can also make the number on your caller ID show up as a local number so you are more likely to answer. Don’t ever give personal information or even verify the information the scammer may have about you. Never say, “Yes” or agree to any offer they have. Just don’t answer the phone if you don’t recognize the number. Scammers are smart and will try anything to steal a buck from you.

If you ever have questions, call a trusted family member or the Vandalia Division of Police before sending money or gift cards to anyone. You have worked hard for your money; make sure you protect it from these scammers!

Estepp
https://www.vandaliadrummernews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2018/05/web1_holly-estepp.jpegEstepp File photo
Telephone scams growing rapidly

By Holly Estepp

Vandalia Police Department

Crime Prevention Officer

Reach the Vandalia Division of Police at (937) 898-5868.

Reach the Vandalia Division of Police at (937) 898-5868.